Tagged: the economist

The Economist | Libya’s oil: Gurgle and splutter

After an initial recovery in output, oil prospects are dipping

 

BOTH sides in Libya’s civil war knew they would need to sell oil again fast once the conflict was over. So for the most part they took care not to ruin the energy infrastructure. For example, while fierce fighting was devastating the western town of Zawiya, the large oil refinery to its north lay idle but untouched by war, its workers still able to have lunch in the canteen.

By mid-2012, less than a year after Muammar Qaddafi’s demise, Libya’s oil production, almost entirely switched off during half a year of ferocious fighting, had regained its pre-war level of about 1.5m barrels a day (b/d)—years earlier than expected. Proudly, Libya’s new leaders said output could soon rise to 2m b/d or more. The oil minister, Abdelbari Arusi, promised a new hydrocarbons law and an auction of leases for unexplored territory to foreign oil companies. Libya’s oil reserves, at 47 billion barrels, already Africa’s biggest, could—it was said—increase by another 10 billion. (…)

Read the rest of the piece here.

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The Economist | Saudi Oil: Down (just a bit) with the price

The Saudis are worried that high prices are hurting the world’s economy
Oct 6th 2012 | DAMMAM | from the print edition

CRANES loom over the landscape in Dammam, a sprawling port city on Saudi Arabia’s Gulf coast. Shiny shopping malls are rising. Flashy cars stream across the causeway towards Bahrain and its nightlife. Young Saudis are making the most of their kingdom’s latest oil boom.

In a compound up the road in Dhahran sits Saudi Aramco, the world’s largest exporter of crude oil and the source of the country’s flourishing finances. Oil prices have averaged about $110 a barrel this year and for months Aramco has been pumping around 10m barrels a day (b/d), one of its highest rates. The Energy Information Administration, the American energy department’s statistical arm, says Saudi Arabia’s net oil income in 2011 was $311 billion. Prices were lower then; this year the country will earn even more. (…)

Read the rest of my piece here.